Power of Pretending

 
It is interesting that we have to cultivate a long-forgotten attitude of pretending and fantasizing we used to have in our childhood if we want to become intuitive. Remembering how to pretend is part of the intuitive learning process, to “make things up” in order to tell the truth by pretending to see it, to hear it, to smell it, or to feel it. We need to stop taking things too seriously and start laughing and fantasizing as we used to do as children. Growing up has made us to lose our power of pretending as we become more “realistic” and logical, when, with intellectual maturity, intuition is potentially most useful to us. But life is a miracle, if we don’t believe it pleasant surprises can hardly come our way. Many times, I have confessed, ‘I am being realistic’, not knowing that such words work against the power that are needed to become really intuitive.
We need to unlearn the habit of operating with the safety sense of logic and the attitude of dismissing impressions because “it doesn’t make sense.” After noticing something, we can pretend at first that the symbols are significant and allow the meaning to come because every symbol and intuitive information has meaning even if it doesn’t make sense to the logical mind at the moment.  
 When I was a child, I can remember it was easy for me to make things up. I acted like actors with passion, boldness and happiness. I derived pleasure in playing the make–believe game because I knew very little about the world around me, and it was easy for me to use pretend-play as a way to experiment with knowing. As a grown up today, I assume that I know so much such that it is difficult for me to act or play like a child. I have lost the fun, natural passion and boldness or ability to make things up because of the social pressures to be logical and sensible. I had submitted my life like a robot to be controlled from outside, the reason why I can no longer easily smile, or see the funny side of life; technology and pressure of life are affecting my natural abilities and senses- there are too much “noises” to contend with. Now, I have realized that I have the power to pretend that I can see, hear, taste, touch and smell things that my logical mind does not want me to perceive. Animals are intuitive because they are not bothered with experience of the world making sense to them to deprive them of valuable intuitive data; we can remember Paul the Octopus that successfully predicted all the 2010 World Cup matches.
 
 
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